Spud Sunday: Foodcamp For Thought

My desk is all a-clutter. Assorted items clamour for my frequently divided attention, and, lately, suffer from varying degrees of neglect.

Over there, my review copy of Domini Kemp’s new book, Itsa Cookbook, languishes. Frankly I got distracted when I read therein that her granny cooked potatoes in a pressure cooker, and have been more interested by the idea of emulating that than by anything else in the book (though I can safely say that fans of Domini’s Saturday columns in The Irish Times will be pleased to know that they can now get themselves a bookful of same).

Also sent to me lately, a glossary of delightfully named Scottish delicacies. The name alone makes me want to try Cullen Skink, a soup of smoked haddock, mashed potato and onions, though desire and execution are proving, as often happens, to be two very different things.

Other bits and pieces, such as reminders of upcoming food events, like the Food and Wine Christmas Show in the RDS from November 26th to 28th, as well as a slew of potato-related news stories, crowd my inbox.

But none of that and, I repeat, none of that is terribly important compared to Foodcamp.

Savour Kilkenny

Last Friday, as part of the Savour Kilkenny festival, food producers, food writers, and representatives of organisations involved in the promotion of Irish food gathered to talk. Attendance and the opportunity to make a presentation were open to all, in return for bringing lunch to share with the assembled masses. The event was pointedly not about selling anyone’s individual brand or product but about community, communication and issues that concern us all as a food producing nation.

Lunch at foodcamp

Dishing out lunch at foodcamp, where there were a lot of brownies

While everyone who attended will have their own takeaways from the day (including, but not limited to, the leftovers from the communal lunch spread), this particular one stayed with me:

Don’t assume that people don’t want to eat Irish food.

Margaret Jeffares, Founder and Managing Director, Good Food Ireland.

If I know anything about Irish food, I know that when it is good, it is very, very good. It deserves to grace many more menus than it does. More than that, though, we all have a vested interest in the regrowth of our local economies, so there is a good business reason to put our local Irish food on the menu.

John McKenna, he of the Bridgestone Guides, observed that, while the economy at large may be in a shambles, those producing and supplying top quality food are doing well, especially those that have embraced new, social-media-led forms of communication to engage with their customers. Co-operative efforts between producers, restaurateurs and retail outlets, such as the Kilkenny Food Trail and the Tipperary Food Producers Network, also help to increase visibility for those involved, though, in order to increase local variety as well as overall export potential, there is a need, and consequently an opportunity, for more producers to become involved.

Yes, opportunity in a recession.

Imagine that.

Be it anything from honey – given that we import €12M worth of the stuff annually – to fish, where some 86% of our catch leaves the country without any further value being added, there is scope for new food businesses to develop. Organisations like Bord Bia can help, but so can savvy usage of social media platforms, as the success of Harry’s Bar & Restaurant on the remote Inishowen Peninsula proves.

Embrace your own (food) culture but do it well.

Helen Finnegan, Knockdrinna Cheese.

In other words, there’s nothing wrong with selling brown bread and apple tarts if that’s what people are happy to buy. Just make sure that your bread and tarts are the best that they can be.

And, while you’re at it, if they are that good, you might want to let the growing ranks of Irish food bloggers know about them. That would be where the newly formed Irish Food Bloggers Association comes in.

Irish Food Bloggers Association

Launched at Foodcamp by Caroline of Bibliocook and Kristin of Dinner du Jour, it’s an exciting and timely development. The new association provides a central resource for Irish food bloggers and those who want to get to know them. And sure who wouldn’t want to do that.

Comments
  • […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Daily Spud, Miriam Donohoe. Miriam Donohoe said: RT @DailySpud: So that was #foodcamp http://bit.ly/daR8LN […]

  • Thanks for the write up Aoife and for coming along for the full day – was great to see you after 2? years.

    keith

  • Great to see you too Keith – it had been a while! Thanks for your part in organising (and to Mag and everyone else involved too) – a great event and hopefully the first of many!

  • Waw!! What a lovely event this must have been! Ooooh,…Thanks for sharing with us!

  • Hey Sophie, it was a lovely event – interesting, informative and really positive. The communal lunch was excellent too – so much good, homemade food (plus extras to bring home :) – a definite win win!

  • It sounds great. I’d have loved to have gone. Maybe next year… I totally agree with the message about Irish food. As a market stall holder at Dingle’s Farmers’ Market, I can testify that people are willing to buy food that they consider is good quality. They’ll even come back for it week after week.

    And do try Cullen Skink. It’s delicious. In fact, you’ve given me the idea of making it for dinner tomorrow!

  • Hi Sharon – it’s that kind of positive message that was the best thing about foodcamp. I’m sure there’ll be similar events in future, so hopefully you’ll get to come along at some stage. And I really must try cullen skink – it’s definitely on the to do list!

  • […] fact is that I’ve had brownies on my mind more or less since Foodcamp. They were brought in great numbers to the event, but I was particularly taken with the cocoa […]

  • […] course there were special festival events too. Inspired by last year’s foodcamp in Kilkenny, there was a similar, albeit lower key version included in the program here. It proved an excellent […]

  • And now it is time for foodcampkk No.2 – 28th October 2011

    See you again this year Aoife and are you going to take a speaking slot?
    And if you could blog post on it to help promote that would be deadly :-)

    keith

  • Hey Keith, have just registered for Foodcamp Kilkenny Mark II. Won’t have time to prep for a speaking slot but will be there to listen & will give it a mention on the blog in the meantime. Looking forward to seeing you there!

  • […] speak on whatever food-related topic moves them – to get a idea of what it’s like, see my take on last year’s event. You’ll find the attendee and speaker list for this year’s event here and you can […]

  • […] returned as part of this weekend’s Savour Kilkenny festival, after a very successful inaugural outing last year. The agenda was largely determined by the attendees, each of whom was free to give a presentation, […]

  • […] Irish love of the spud a good run for its money. She was speaking at Foodcamp – an event now in its third year at the Savour Kilkenny Food Festival, which encourages anyone who so desires to make a presentation […]

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